movies, Reviews, winter

Winter Movie Review: “Winter A-Go-Go”

This may be news to you but “winter” is a genre of film and I’ve made a good case to support this (https://wordsbywellsy.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/your-guide-to-winter-movies/). Here’s a review of another favourite winter movie.

“Winter A-Go-Go”  (1965)

Starring William Wellman, Jr., James Stacy, Beverly Adams, John Anthony Hayes, Julie Parrish and Nancy Czar. Directed by Richard Benedict. From Columbia Pictures.

winter-a-go-go-movie-poster-27x40-james-stacy-william-wellman-jr-beverly-adams

“On the go-go in the snow-snow”. Nuff said.

Young, good-looking best friends Jeff Forrester (Wellman, Jr.) and Danny Frazer (Stacy) run a ski camp in Heavenly Valley, a winter resort town in Lake Tahoe. Jeff has inherited the place but the mortgage is held by a gangster-type who wants it for himself. The gangster-type sends a couple of clowns to make life rough for the boys and their guests so that they won’t be able to make their payments. Through the course of all this, Jo Ann (Adams) pines for Jeff and Danny makes dates with all the girls they hire to work at the place. Skiing, dancing, singing and laughs abound.

And that’s about it. There’s not much plot to talk about; which is just fine with a movie like this. As with American International’s “Beach Party” movies, “Winter A-Go-Go” does well depicting the effervescence of youth, the seemingly careless time of life. It shows surface concerns in a light-hearted way. Anybody watching knows life is never – and has never been – that simple but there is something comforting in seeing problems taken so lightly, treated with a song and a dance and handled so easily. It’s what we call an “escape” picture and it’s perfect for winter viewing. After all, these kids willingly go to where the snow is.

Brinkman

Danny gets a ski lesson from real-life instructor Peter Brinkman.

The cast is filled with great looking people, some of which actually have character and do alright. Wellman is the handsome son of the legendary directer William Wellman (“Wings”, “The Public Enemy”, “A Star is Born”, “Nothing Sacred”). Wellman appeared in “Swingin’ Summer” – again with James Stacy – the same year as “Winter A-Go-Go” and went on to a minor career in television. James Stacy is another story altogether. He was born in Los Angeles to a Lebanese-American father who was a bookmaker. Handsome and charismatic, Stacy was married to actresses Connie Stevens and Kim Darby. An avid motorcycle rider – as seen in “Winter A-Go-Go” – he was riding with his girlfriend in 1973 when he was struck by a drunk driver. His girlfriend was killed and Stacy lost his left arm and leg. In an early judgement against establishments that serve patrons to intoxication, Stacy was awarded a $1.9 million settlement against the bar that served the drunk driver. Stacy returned to acting, playing roles that incorporated his disability and earned two Emmy nominations. Unfortunately, his final years were marred by sexual molestation – as perpetrator and victim – prison and a suicide attempt. He died in 2016 of anaphylactic shock. He was 79.

On a lighter note, pretty Canadian Beverly Adams was born in Edmonton. When she was a child, her family moved to Burbank – I always wonder how that happens; Edmonton to Burbank! She was uncredited in two Elvis Presley films, appeared as klutzy dream girl Cassandra in “How to Stuff a Wild Bikini”, played Matt Helm’s girl friday Lovey Kravezit (?!) in the “Matt Helm” films and then retired when she married hairstylist Vidal Sassoon. They had four children, one of whom, actress/model Catya, died of a drug-induced heart attack. Adams and Sassoon divorced in 1980 and Adams started her own line of pet care products.

John Anthony Hayes plays Burt, one of the guys that tries to sabotage the hotel. He plays a rat well as evidenced by his turn as Frank who was mean to Fabian in “Ride the Wild Surf”. Julie Parrish showed up a year later looking quite fetching in “Paradise, Hawaiian Style” with Presley and “Fireball 500” with Frankie Avalon. A career appearing on random television episodes came to an end in 2003 when she died of ovarian cancer, aged 62. Keep an eye out for cutie Dori, played by Judy Parker. Judy was married for 45 years to Bob Gaudio of the Four Seasons. She co-wrote with Bob the fantastic “December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night)”. Judy just died last fall, aged 79. And keep an eye out for Paul Gleason among the gang of kids hanging out at the lodge. He would go on to play jerks in “The Breakfast Club” and “Die Hard”. Real-life ski instructor, Peter Brinkman, plays himself. According to both IMDb and Wikipedia, director Richard Benedict is the same Richard Benedict who portrayed “Curly” Steffans in “Ocean’s 11” (1960). But I can hardly believe it.

The gang

The gang gets to work. L to R: Nancy Czar, Linda Rogers, Tom Nardini, Julie Parrish, James Stacy, Beverly Adams and William Wellman, Jr.

As with all films of this ilk, we need music. Nooney Rickett sports one of the better names I’ve ever heard. And just try to find some info on the guy! He did join Arthur Lee in a later configuration of the legendary band Love. His Nooney Rickett Four sings “Ski City” (“put away your surfing gear and grab some skis”), a blatant knock-off of “Surf City” written by the prolific team of Howard Greenfield and Jack Keller and “Do the Ski (With Me)” (“If there’s a bump, you better jump. If there’s a tree, turn your ski”) co-written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. What Nooney lacks in personality he makes up for in hair. The engaging title track (by Greenfield/Keller) is performed by the Hondells. Joni Lyman delivers “King of the Mountain”. Joni is attractive with a real contemporary look. The Reflections wear some great sweaters and sing “I’m Sweet on You”. They are better known for their great blue-eyed soul hit “(Just Like) Romeo and Juliet”. James Stacy leads the gang through “Hip Square Dance”, a ridiculous idea that is saved only by some half-decent choreography. It’s a foolish segment that brings to mind Bob Denver’s creepy upside-down goatee number in “For Those Who Think Young”.

Nooney

The Nooney Rickett Four featuring Joni Lyman run through “Do the Ski (with Me)”. Nooney has a great guitar and a great sweater. And that’s about it.

Filming took place in the Eldorado National Forest in Eldorado County, California and at Heavenly Mountain resort in South Lake Tahoe near the California-Nevada border. There’s a great scene near the beginning of the film when the kids drive up to Jeff’s resort to begin work and you see some of the hotels in the area. One of which you can clearly see is the Lakeview Arms Motel of Bijou, California in Eldorado County. The place no longer exists but I saw on eBay that someone is selling an old hotel key from the place. The scenery is wonderful and the movie looks like it could have been made by the Heavenly Valley Chamber of Commerce.

Lakeview Arms

The Lakeview Arms Motel of Bijou, California sadly is no more.

An interesting note about this film is that it ends with a wedding between two of the principals. That kind of adult seriousness is almost never depicted in films like this. It’s notable in this case that these two go ahead and get married without parents or any of the usual pomp or prep. This must have appealed to the teens in the audience – it may even have given them ideas. The fact that there’s a wedding is actually huge.

In conclusion, it’s a fun little film to watch in the winter. The acting, of course, is not great but the two male leads seem to be harbouring some serious depth underneath the required goofiness and the girls are attractive and earnest. There is some great scenery and some really nice winter clothing; nice sweaters and women’s clothes. It’s an adventure you’d love to have yourself in a pretty cool place. Like one of the girls says when they first get to the lodge and see that it’s not in the best of shape: “It’s better than my room at home”.

film18-2

“Winter A-Go-Go”: Better Than Your Room at Home

 

Advertisements
Standard
movies, Reviews, winter

Winter Movie Review: “North to Alaska”

This may be news to you but “winter” is a genre of film and I’ve made a good case to support this (https://wordsbywellsy.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/your-guide-to-winter-movies/). Here’s a review of another favourite winter movie.

“North to Alaska” (1960) 

Starring John Wayne, Stewart Granger, Capucine, Ernie Kovacs, Fabian and Mickey Shaughnessey. Directed by Henry Hathaway. From 20th-Century Fox

65abe3f15b7d5856d096514b71e6f34c--poster-film-poster-art.jpg

Alaska had recently become the 50th state and that figured prominently in the advertising.

In Nome at the turn of the last century, Sam McCord and George Pratt are partners who have just struck it rich. Now George can send for his beloved Jenny. George sends Sam to Seattle to get her and Sam finds her but she has forgotten about George and has married someone else. Before Sam heads back to Alaska to give George the bad news, he runs into “Angel”, a working girl at the Hen House. Angel is pretty and French – just like Jenny – so Sam decides to bring her back for George. However Cupid, as he often does, has other ideas. Throw in a scheming sharpie casino owner, some claim-jumping varmints and a few outrageous brawls and you’ve got an entertaining and colourful yarn.

Right off the top I have to admit that there is no snow to be seen in “North to Alaska” so it has become a winter movie somewhat by default – it takes place in Alaska. Like other winter movies that do feature snow, though, it’s the charm of the places these people spend their time that give it a winter feeling. The cabins and the shacks, the fires and just the comfortable places that people can make for themselves amongst the uncomfortable terrain. Scenic locations Point Mugu and Mammoth Mountain in California stand in for Alaska and make for some pretty scenery. The muddy main street of town adds a lot to the realism and the film in general has a great ‘look’.

“North to Alaska” is a comedy. I still think it’s a little hard to believe that Wayne did full-on comedies but he did and he did them well. The comedy in this film is quite broad; maybe too broad. This can mostly be seen in the brawls – they are outlandish, over-the-top and played for laughs. I call this the “”McLintock!” Factor”; that film of Wayne’s also features an elaborate fight. Thing is, “North to Alaska” came out 3 years before both “McLintock!” and “Donovan’s Reef”, films that both feature comedic fights. So, I guess it’s the “Alaska Factor”.

48ce8adebd777b9048c91c41fc8b2a3f

Fabian, Wayne and Granger engage in the original “muddy brawl” while Capucine looks on. Wayne’s face here displays his natural charismatic personality.

There are some things that are charming about this broad comedy, though. The acting, for one. It is really quite good. I was particularly impressed with Capucine as Michelle/Angel. She had most of the heavy lifting where character evolution is concerned and she pulls it off nicely. As I’ve said, Wayne is very watchable in a comedic role – “Timberrr!!” – and Fabian may overact a bit but he is playing a wide-eyed 17-year-old. Stewart Granger has much charisma but his accent seems too refined for the role.

The other thing that stands out is the plot point of “Angel” being transformed from prostitute back to “Michelle”; she is a woman who wants to make herself a new life. Sam is taken with her immediately and he helps to legitimize Michelle. It is a really endearing part of this screenplay. You’ll notice when Sam takes Michelle to meet his Swedish friends, they are right away disgusted that Sam has brought a ‘hussy’ to their picnic. When he stands up to them and says he is leaving, they come around and welcome Michelle into the festivities. Sam vouches for her and they accept her. Only a few minutes after this, a boat captain remarks that Michelle has been a pleasure to have aboard as she is very “ladylike”. Michelle is legit now. This change is important to her and she wants to make it stick.

The movie is very charming and brimming with zest and character. It’s loads of fun and I can highly recommend it.

Standard
movies, Reviews, winter

Winter Movie Review: “Valley of the Dolls”

This may be news to you but “winter” is a genre of film and I’ve made a good case to support this (https://wordsbywellsy.wordpress.com/2017/02/05/your-guide-to-winter-movies/). Here’s a review of another favourite winter movie.

“Valley of the Dolls” (1967)

Starring Patty Duke, Barbara Parkins, Sharon Tate, Paul Burke, Susan Hayward, Tony Scotti and Martin Milner. Directed by Mark Robson. From 20th Century Fox.

ValleyOfDolls_GBQ

The film was marketed as salacious and sensational.

Now, I know what you’re thinking and – partly – you’re right. But let me explain. I have always said “I’m a fan. Not a critic”. Bruce Kirkland used to review movies for the Toronto Sun back in the day and he used to infuriate me. Because he was a movie critic. Critic. His job, by definition, was to analyze films and point out their strengths and weaknesses based on his experience and his abilities. But he still bugged me because he never said things like “this is a bad film. But I like it!” – which, of course, a movie reviewer would never say. Their job is to critique and not to gush.

MY job, however, is to gush. I think the main reason I enjoy movies is because of the escape they provide me and classic movies are all the better because, in addition, I enjoy them as a window on the past. I remember watching James Bond movies in the late 1970’s-early 1980’s and saying “why has he stopped off in the Bahamas? Why is he there? What actually is happening?!”. I didn’t care about the plots – I was drinking in the “Bond-ness”. Same with my Falcon movies of the 1940’s – not really following the plot but man, look at that apartment and look at what he’s wearing! I love movies (and music and books) for what I “get” from them. They give me things just by being – not by being good.

Which leads me to “guilty pleasures”. Things you know may be of poor quality but you love them. Beach Party movies, elevator music, the Montreal Canadiens – things you can’t defend. Perhaps the guiltiest of all guilty pleasures is “Valley of the Dolls” from 20th Century-Fox in 1967. This film has gained a reputation as one of the ‘worst’ films in history. It’s outlandish dialogue and acting and it’s over-the-top soap opera plot have garnered it many bad reviews, parodies, one bad ‘sequel’ and the disdain of the critics. As often happens, though, at the same time this movie has gained a faithful following of ardent fans who love it. Most of them say that it’s so bad, it’s wonderful and they love it although they know it’s ridiculous. I can see their point and I tend to agree but every time I watch this movie I come away saying that there is some real depth in the story it tells and it really packs a lot of entertainment value.

Valley-Of-the-Dolls2

The tragic Sharon Tate as the tragic Jennifer North, Canadian Barbara Parkins as Anne Welles and Patty Duke as wicked Neely O’Hara.

The story tracks the lives and careers of three women: Neely O’Hara (Duke), Anne Welles, (Canadian Parkins) and Jennifer North (Tate). Their lives are a series of ups and downs, successes and failures, men and ‘dolls’ – the prescription drugs that they all indulge in to varying degrees. Neely starts out as an ingenue in a Broadway musical. She has genuine talent – and that scares the show’s star, Helen Lawson (Hayward), who has Neely fired. Neely is consoled by her husband, Mel (Milner), who is beginning to think that a successful career means more to Neely than he does. Indeed, it does and Neely begins to alienate Mel by throwing herself into becoming a star while growing ever more dependent on barbiturates and the like. Anne is a quiet, small town New England beauty who wants to experience life on her own before settling down with her childhood sweetheart. It is a picturesque winter day when she boards the train for New York, saying farewell to her youth and pivoting toward adulthood and a secretarial job for a high-powered Broadway agent. Jennifer is an actress of astounding beauty and negligible acting abilities. While she is a down-to-earth girl, she realizes that her physical appearance is all she has to ensure her the work and the paychecks that will keep her – and her family back home – alive. Neely ends up a major star who becomes self-centered and obnoxious and she eventually has to enter a clinic to kick her drug addiction. Anne is discovered by a cosmetics mogul and becomes successful and wealthy as the model for his line. She becomes the “Gillian Girl”. She falls for Lyon Burke (Paul Burke), another agent in her office, who won’t marry her and eventually breaks her heart, driving her into drug-fueled depression. Jennifer catches the eye of singer Tony Polar (Scotti) and they marry. Tony is stricken with a terrible disease that incapacitates him both mentally and physically and lands him in an expensive clinic. To pay the bills, Jennifer makes the tough decision to denigrate herself by making “art” films in Paris. Her eventual demise is heartbreaking.

Tales of the production and legacy of this film are legion. I will only skim the surface here and suggest you read up on it yourself. I can also highly recommend the novel this film is based on by Jacqueline Susann but keep in mind that drastic changes were made to the story resulting in Susann’s ire. Judy Garland was originally cast as Helen Lawson – an inspired choice – but Garland was in such rough shape at the time – herself a victim of ‘dolls’ – that she was fired soon after production began. There are reports, however, that the director of the film, Canadian Mark Robson (“Peyton Place”), was particularly hard on Garland. The soundtrack for this film is an absolute gem. I do admit, though, that sometimes I love a movie’s soundtrack because the songs bring to mind the scenes of the film that I remember fondly and sometimes I’m blind – or “deaf” – to the songs’ lack of quality. The songs that are performed in this film were written by the great Andre Previn and his wife, Dory. The title track is excellent. It is performed in the film by Dionne Warwick. Dory’s lyric asks a series of questions and reveals a sense of loss and confusion. They speak of living a roller coaster existence and a desire to “get off of this merry-go-round”. As the film progresses, the lyrics are deftly changed to reflect Anne’s story arc. When things start to get heavy for her, the lyrics change to: “When will I learn? Where will I find what is real?”. And when she hits rock bottom: “Have to get off from this ride, need to get hold of my pride…how was I lost in this game? How will I think of my name? When did I stop feeling sure, feeling safe…?”. It’s an excellent technique; like a Greek chorus. Singer Tony Scotti – the only performer in the film not dubbed – performs “Come Live With Me”. It is a stunning song that has a haunting, dramatic quality that had me searching for a copy for years. The song is used to reflect the action at different key points in Jennifer’s story arc. The score itself was done by John Williams. Yes, that John Williams. The composer of the themes for the “Star Wars” films, the “Indiana Jones” films, “Jaws” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” has been nominated for 50 Academy Awards (second-best to Walt Disney). His score for “Valley of the Dolls” gave him his first Oscar nom. Check for a hidden lounge music gem on the soundtrack called “Chance Meeting”. It’s delightful.

sam-jarvis2

The historic Samuel Jarvis House in Redding, Connecticut stood in for Anne’s family home in the fictional town of Lawrenceville.

Here’s the thing that “grounds” this film, the thing that draws me to it every January. The aspect of winter comes in to play in a very significant way in this story. I don’t know if the writers intended it this way but this is what I get from it. As I’ve said, Anne Welles comes from a rural New England town, a town that has known many crippling winters. Her life before she heads for the city is briefly shown to be one of family and home. We see her at home in the winter with her mother and her aunt. The very day she gets on the train to leave town it is snowing. From her window, she looks out upon the Norman Rockwell landscape that has made up the total of her safe childhood and teenage years. Her dreams lead her to New York City and from there she ends up in sunny California. It seems to me that this is the basis of every success story you’ve ever heard; no matter where someone has come from, the goal, the peak, the end of the rainbow is somewhere warm. With sunshine, beaches, ocean. And here in the Golden State is where Anne becomes successful and wealthy, yes. But here is where she also loses her way, becomes unhappy and addicted to ‘dolls’. Lyon has broken her heart, her friends have betrayed and abandoned her, and she is spiraling out of control. During a scene she has alone in her beach house, she finally throws the pill bottle away and runs to the ocean. It’s a scene that may not be acted the best and is ridiculed a lot but it is also a scene that shows her hitting rock bottom and desiring to be cleansed in the waters of the Pacific. But that is not enough for her. She needs to reset, to get her bearings again. She needs healing. This, for her, can only be found in one place. To really make things right, she goes home. Home where it’s full-on winter. Winter. A time when we are forced to turn inward. A time of the mind and soul as opposed to the hedonistic pleasures of the flesh to be found in the sun and sand. A time when there are fewer distractions, less to do and when there is more time to be spent looking at ourselves, and reevaluating the way we live. To me, that speaks to the idea that winter can represent comfort and home, memories of childhood, of family and a wholesome, safe lifestyle. To me, it’s an intriguing and sensitive theme to show up in a film like this. During Anne’s redemption, a time when she is battered and bruised but still willing and able to take another crack at life, the title track is sung once more. This time the lyrics speak of a dawning realization. An epiphany inextricably tied to the restorative powers of the winter:

“Got to be here, have to be where I belong…came to know where I went wrong. It was all here, why was I blind to it then? This is my world…this is where I’ll start again.” (italics mine)

5221topDoll

Anne – looking terribly glamorous for a hick town – survives life and hits the reset button.

As a side note, I researched the filming locations for this film and found that Anne’s house in “Lawrenceville” is actually the Samuel Jarvis house in the picturesque and historic town of Redding, Connecticut. The house dates from the 1790’s. I got some help on this from the fine folks at the Redding Historical Society.

Bottom line is the film is tons of fun. I suggest you check it out.

 

Standard